Mind have published research which showed that men are twice as likely to have mental health problems due to their job. 

Mind surveyed 15,000 employees, of which 1,763 were currently experiencing poor mental health. The research breaks down gender differences in what men and women attributed to being the cause of poor mental health. One in three men in comparison to one in seven, considered their job to be a contributing factor to their poor mental health rather than problems outside of work. Whereas women considered both their job and problems outside of work contributing to poor mental health.

Emma Mamo, Head Of Workplace Wellbeing at mind, considers how the "macho" culture men can find themselves working in, may be a contributing factor but concerningly also preventing them from seeking help and support from their employer. Only one in three men felt their workplace had a culture where it was possible to speak about their mental health problems and only one in three men had taken time off for poor mental health. 

Emma Mamo says "In the last few years, we've seen employers come on leaps and bounds when it comes to tackling stress and supporting the mental wellbeing of their staff, including those with a diagnosed mental health problem. However, there is more to do and employers do need to recognise the different approaches they may need to adopt in how they address mental health in the workplace".She goes on to comment that "it is concerning that so many men find themselves unable to speak to their bosses about the impact that work is having on their wellbeing.... the majority of managers feel confident in supporting employees with mental health problems, but they can only offer extra support if they're aware there is a problem". 

Have you had experience of talking to your employer about mental health? Do you feel you would be able to discuss a mental health problem with your manager? Let us know on Twitter, Facebook or LinkedIn

Are you an employer who wants to evaluate psychosocial risk in their organisation? IQ Verify are able to audit to a psychosocial risk management standard to help evaluate and implement interventions to improve psychological wellbeing in the workplace. 

 

 

 

 

 

Published in IAM Blog
Monday, 11 September 2017 00:00

Prepare For Interview

The recruitment process is notoriously nerve-racking - particularly at senior level where the stakes are high and competition is fierce. Lisa Forrest (Head of Internal Talent Acquisition, at recruitment specialists Alexander Mann Solutions) explains to IAM Manager how to get ready for the big day. 

The rise of the sophisticated jobseeker, who has high expectations of how an employer brand should engage with them, and who is as adept as researching organisations as rehearsing interview scenarios, has encouraged employers to raise the bar in terms of interview process. However, there are still steps you can take to maximise your chances of success. 

You should, of course, prepare for any interview by thoroughly researching the potential employer and forming a clear idea of what you are able to offer them. If you are working with an internal or embedded executive search specialist, they will be able to provide you with useful background - such as interview dynamics and dress code - before you even set foot in the door. If you know anyone who currently works at the company, or has done previously, ask for some frank feedback. It can be valuable to have a first-hand account to complement the exhaustive online fact-finding that you will no-doubt be undertaking. 

You're A Star! 

Enter the interview armed with a handful of examples of professional achievements, and be ready to discuss these in detail in terms of strategy, perspective, evaluation and the impact on the company's bottom line. Answers to competency based questions can be given structure with the STAR acronyms; outline the Situation, Task, Action and Result. 

If you are asked an unexpected question, think it over briefly and answer to the best of your ability - be sure to explain the thinking behind your reply. The capability to be able to challenge, solve or even deflect problems is an essential skill in the workplace, and hirers may try to catch you off-guard to judge how you are likely to behave in stressful situations in the future. Remember to be confident in your capabilities - the fact you have secured an interview indicates that you have impressed with you application so far so take some deep breaths before you go in to help stay cool and shake off any nerves. 

Skill Sets 

According to a recent report by Forbes Magazine, nearly half (46 per cent) of executive hires fail within 18 months. As frightening as this statistic is, the really insightful and helpful number is this; only 11 per cent of these executives fail because of their technical ability or due to the lack of the required skill set. What this says to me is that firms are adept at hiring against a skill set; interviewers are rarely making mistakes in hiring people that can't actually do the job. Where the executive fails in by far the majority of cases it is down to their ability to do the job in that particular environment and culture. 

Be Authentic

With this in mind, it is essential that you are relaxed and authentic throughout the interview process. Never wear a mask that will inevitably slip later down the line. Technical ability can be taught, but core competencies and charisma cannot - and personality and cultural fit are essential to successful placements. It is also essential that you embrace the interview stage as an investigative opportunity. Use it as a platform to ask pertinent questions - whether that be what the organisation's CSR policy is, or if there will be the opportunity to work internationally further down the line. Remember an interview process is a two-way-street, and it's better if you find out sooner rather than later if this is not the golden opportunity you have been waiting for. 

And finally, don't forget the obvious; avoid alcohol and get plenty of rest the night before, be well presented and arrive early - and smile. This could be the beginning of the next step in your management career. 

What are your thoughts on preparing for an Interview? 

Let us know on LinkedIn, Facebook and Twitter. There are free webinars available for IAM members - you can access them on the IAM portal, or, if you would like to participate in a live Q&A session - keep an eye on our events page. 

 

 

 

Published in IAM Blog
Tuesday, 01 August 2017 00:00

Email Emancipation

If you can't keep on top of your inbox and the ping of an email notification brings a tremor of dread, you're not alone. We can suffer from email overload and need to break free. 

You walk through the office door with a to-do list in your pocket and a swing in your step. Then you hit your desk, sport your bulging inbox and you're bogged down, overwhelmed and distracted before the working day has even begun. If this sounds familiar then you could be suffering email overload - sending, receiving and processing more emails than you can actually handle. 

We all know email has its uses: it's fast, can be saved for later and can reach as many people as is needed in one go - all without leaving your device. But research has shown that the more emails you receive each day, the less you are likely to process effectively. In fact a US study has shown that for every 100 emails a person receives, they will respond to roughly five. With the volume of daily emails ever increasing, dealing with email overload is one of the biggest challenges today's employees face. 

But you don't have to just live with thousands of emails cluttering up your inbox. Here are some tips to set you on your way to email freedom and point your colleagues in the right direction too. 

A Tidy Inbox Is A Tidy Mind.... 

Your inbox should not be your only file - yet all too often is. Your email is an online filing cabinet so create folders specific to your roles: you might have action required, project folders, even a file to store information which may be needed "one day" (and once it's filed neatly away, schedule in reading time for this folder once a week). Most email programmes allow you to set rules to filter emails from your boss or different colleagues into their own separate folders before they have a chance to take root in your inbox. 

Keep To Schedule 

Don't be tempted to check your email every few minutes and turn off notifications. Instead, schedule in specific times during the day to check your emails and stick to them. If you are heavily involved in a task, keep to the two-minute rule - only respond to emails that take less than two minutes to resolve. Save everything else for later. 

Be Subject Specific 

When you send an email make it clear in the subject header exactly what you want. If you need a response, label your header "Response Required". If you are simply providing the recipient with information use the subject FYI. And be very clear about the subject matter - don't label your emails "quick query" or "just a note". Instead state "two questions regarding budget" or "annual report: please forward". 

Keep It Brief

Ensure emails you send to others are brief and to the point. Do not be tempted to include lots of information (your recipient might not even finish reading it) and send separate emails for separate topics. If anyone sends you an email addressing several different issues, separate your replies into different emails. You will soon find others follow your lead and you will quickly be able to tackle each email (or at least know where to file it!). 

Email Isn't Everything

If the purpose of your message is the equivalent of a quick chat/quick response item, use an instant messaging system instead. This way, the recipient cannot be tempted to keep and file the information. Or instead of cluttering up others' inboxes with a stream of emails, why not just call a short meeting and then send round a list of action points afterward. Not only does it keep those email boxes a few emails lighter but a quick meeting is, more often than not, just friendlier. Sometimes you can't beat face to face.  

Do you have any tips? Let us know on Facebook, Twitter or Linkedin

Published in IAM Blog
Tuesday, 25 July 2017 12:27

Most Wanted!

By 2020, the most desirable employee benefit will be flexible working, revealed a study from salary sacrifice scheme provider Grass Roots (The future of work research). Over 1000 employees were asked about which workplace benefits are most likely to be important to them in the future. Almost half (49%) were hoping to achieve a better work/life balance in the future with two thirds looking for the freedom to work whenever and from wherever they want or to have some degree of flexibility within a fixed working period. 

"It's clear that the workforce is keen to move away from the 9 to 5 culture as they don't want to be chained to a desk every day and instead move towards being able to work in a way that better suits their home life" says Stephen Holt, commercial director at Grass Roots. "Organisations should now take steps to address their current working practices and assess the realities of offering staff the ability to work more flexibly. The ability to offer staff this perk could have a significant impact on staff morale and also aid staff recruitment and retention". 

Other coveted benefits on the wish list included more team building experiences, the ability to work from home, education funding for advancement of learning and stress counselling. 

Published in IAM Blog
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